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Dyche on Southampton Defeat

16 October 2016

Sean Dyche was baffled that his side were not awarded a penalty that might have changed the course of the defeat to Southampton.


Dyche admitted his side were second best to a rampant Saints side who won 3-1 thanks to Charlie Austin’s brace and a Nathan Redmond strike.


Sam Vokes’ late penalty was a mere consolation as the Clarets fell to a third successive defeat on the road.


But Dyche was left frustrated after Virgil Van Dijk’s foul on Johann Berg Gudmundsson was not deemed a penalty, while the Icelandic midfielder’s innocuous touch on Sam, McQueen was deemed a spot kick.




The gaffer, who also conceded that the award of the Clarets late spot kick - for Dusan Tadic’s push on Ben Mee – was soft, said: “Overall we were well beaten in the end.


“I thought after a tough start for the first 12 or 15 minutes, I felt we softened the game down a bit – and the big defining moment of the first half was the penalty.


“How that is not a penalty is beyond me.


“It doesn’t guarantee you win the game, but if you score you have a foothold, away from home and the feeling in the stadium changes and their team feeling changes.


“You have to be disappointed because that’s three decisions we’ve had go against us now. We had the penalty not given at Swansea and the one (goal) against Arsenal two weeks ago. And now this.




“Equally, the one for them in the second half is, well, I don’t know where that lives!


“On a scale of one to 10 in terms of contact, that’s a 0.5, and what can you do? How we don’t get one and they do is out of my hands.


“I must say though, I don’t make excuses. They are a really good side who are on good form at the moment and they are certainly a side to be reckoned with.”


Dyche, who also lost Steven Defour in the first half with a hamstring injury, added: “Playing away is a big growth for us.


“At home we play with bravery, fervour and energy. That has to come from us away from home.


“We know where we are and we know we have to develop quickly. Our home form has been good and we’ve looked solid.


“Away we haven’t found that feel and we need that inner bravery to play.


“We are playing within ourselves and we can’t do that, and that has to change by working with the players, talking to them and reassuring them.


“It’s many things, and when the whistle blows you have to give your lot.”



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